Understanding human behaviour with Dr Daniel Siegel's 'Hand Model of the Brain'

Over the last few weeks I have been running our Conflict Management train-the-trainer programme to organisations ranging from disability services to transport providers. 

This programme equips an organisation with an in-house team of certified Maybo trainers, giving it an afforable, sustainable and self-sufficient method of delivering Maybo conflict management and physical intervention training to it's staff. I often find the partnerships work really well as we can offer greater tailoring and contextualisation of our programmes, ensuring they support and work with an organization’s culture and processes. 

One area of common ground to all is to ensure training resonates and engages with delegates.  Whilst at Maybo, we have resources that are visually engaging, promote opportunities to contextualize and are intuitive, it is always appealing to look to fresh ideas. 

I wanted to share a resource that I have been working with and have to be particularly effective at helping learners to understanding human behaviour. 

Dan Siegel’s 'Hand Model of the Brain' model is an engaging video clip that explains how the brain works, and in particular, the function of 'triggers' and 'inhibitors'. These are key areas through all Maybo training programmes, which focus understanding challenging behaviour as a fundamental pre-requisite to being able to effectively and safely reduce and respond to it.

I use this resource to introduce the concepts and then work through them in detail with the group.  The visual only lasts for a couple of minutes but I often find that people can identify with the “flipping of a lid” and this allows people to engage with the training long after the session finishes.

by Lorraine Harvey, Head of Training, Maybo Australia

 

You can watch the clip here.

Below is a full transcript:

 

0:00
one of the most rewarding experiences
0:02
for me has been to study brain science
0:06
and apply it to the experience of
0:08
parenting and the hand model the brain
0:11
that I used to teach parents is very
0:12
useful to understand that so if you take
0:15
your thumb and put in the middle of your
0:17
palm
0:17
put your fingers over the top this is a
0:19
very useful model of the brain and when
0:21
we can actually see in front of us
0:24
what's going on the brain then we can
0:26
change what the brain does so let me
0:29
walk you through very basically what
0:31
happens in this brain and the structures
0:33
in it and it goes like this
0:35
the spinal cord comes up represented the
0:38
wrist and then you have coming up into
0:40
the skull the brain stem and the limbic
0:43
area which work together to regulate
0:45
arousal and your emotions and the way
0:48
you have a fight fight freeze response
0:51
these are below the cortex the limbic
0:53
brain stem areas and the cortex is
0:55
higher part of the brain that allows us
0:57
to perceive the outside world to think
1:00
and reason and this front most part of
1:02
the brain right behind your foreheads
1:04
the person's oriented like this is
1:06
actually the part that regulates the
1:08
subcortical limbic brain stem areas this
1:12
regulation is very important because
1:13
sometimes we can have all sorts of
1:16
things happen in life or tired or
1:17
exhausted someone pushes a particular
1:20
emotional button and we can flip our
1:22
lids so rather than being tuned in and
1:25
connected and balanced and flexible we
1:27
can lose all that flexibility even lose
1:30
moral reasoning and act in ways that are
1:33
terrifying to others including our
1:35
children now you can actually bring
1:38
yourself back online and come back to
1:40
the high road and make a repair with
1:42
your child and that's important to
1:44
explain to them and you can also use
1:46
this hand of the brain to explain to
1:48
children even as young as five and six
1:50
how to understand when their emotions
1:54
are rising up from the brainstem and
1:56
limbic areas here and how it's
1:58
overriding the prefrontal area and
2:01
making it so they may be about to flip
2:02
their lids so I've had kids come tell me
2:05
that they're about to go flip their lids
2:09
and they need a break they need a
2:10
timeout and I even just name
2:13
that they contain it and that's the
2:16
power of using the hand model for
2:18
ourselves and our children help us all
2:21
makes sense of what goes on in the
2:23
emotional communication that we have in
2:27
the course of day-to-day life

 

Posted by Maybo on April 23, 2018

info@maybo.com.au